The Righteous Brothers’ Bill Medley

The Righteous Brothers’ Bill Medley

Inducted by Long Island’s own Billy Joel, Bill Medley and the Righteous Brothers joined the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame as part of the Class of 2003. Now 82, Bill sat down to chat with WHLI’s Rob Rush before he plays a show in nearby New Jersey.

Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision for The Society of Singers/AP Images

School budgets vote Tuesday

School budgets vote Tuesday

School budgets and school boards will be voted on Tuesday across Long Island.

Nearly $16 billion in proposed school spending will appear on Long Island ballots, along with 373 candidates running for boards in 124 districts.

Nassau 911 system restored after brief outage

Nassau 911 system restored after brief outage

The Nassau County 911 system was fully restored Monday night after brief outage
Officials said the system went down around 4:30 p.m. It was down for about an hour before being fully restored.
What exactly cause the system to go down was not immediately clear.

The Latest | Defense lawyers in Trump’s hush money trial ask the judge to dismiss the case

The Latest | Defense lawyers in Trump’s hush money trial ask the judge to dismiss the case

NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump’s hush money trial entered its final stretch with the prosecution resting its case late Monday afternoon following the conclusion of star witness Michael Cohen ‘s testimony.
Cohen concluded his testimony after nearly four full days on the witness stand. He looked in Trump’s direction as he walked out of the courtroom before a court officer directed him down the aisle.
In his testimony, Cohen placed the former president directly at the center of the alleged scheme to stifle negative stories to fend off damage to his White House bid. Among other things, Cohen told jurors that Trump promised to reimburse him for the money he fronted and was constantly updated about efforts to silence women who alleged sexual encounters with him. Trump denies the women’s claims.
Defense attorneys had resumed cross-examination of Cohen with a series of questions about his business dealings and other activities in the lead-up to the payment to porn actor Stormy Daniels. They further dug into Cohen’s sources of income in the years since Trump originally took office.
The defense called two witnesses on Monday — attorney Robert Costello and paralegal Daniel Sitko.
It remains unclear whether Trump will testify.
Merchan said earlier in the day that closing arguments could take place the Tuesday after Memorial Day.
The trial is in its 19th day.
Trump has pleaded not guilty to 34 felony counts of falsifying business records.
The case is the first-ever criminal trial of a former U.S. president and the first of four prosecutions of Trump to reach a jury.
Currently:
— What we’ve learned so far in the Trump hush money trial and what to watch for as it wraps up
— Trump receives NRA endorsement as he vows to protect gun rights
— Trump hush money case: A timeline of key events
— Key players: Who’s who at Trump’s hush money criminal trial
— Hush money, catch and kill and more: A guide to unique terms used at Trump’s trial
Here’s the latest:
JUDGE WON’T RULE ON MOTION TO DISMISS UNTIL LATER ON
The judge in Donald Trump’s money trial on Monday said he would issue a decision on the defense’s motion to dismiss the case at a later day.
Trump attorney Todd Blanche had beseeched Judge Juan M. Merchan to “not let this case go to the jury relying on Mr. Cohen’s testimony,” arguing that Michael Cohen had not only lied repeatedly under oath in the past but again while testifying in this trial.
But Merchan appeared unmoved by the argument, asking Blanche whether he believed that “as a matter of law, this person’s so not worthy of belief that it shouldn’t even be considered by the jury?”
Blanche said that he did.
“You said his lies are irrefutable,” the judge replied. “But you think he’s going to fool 12 New Yorkers into believing this lie?”
Prosecutor Matthew Colangelo shot back that “the trial evidence overwhelmingly supports each element” of the alleged offenses, and the case should proceed to the jury.
Colangelo argued that the jury has seen “overwhelming” evidence that the records of the payments to Cohen were falsely categorized as payments for legal services instead of reimbursement and that there was ample evidence that the alleged fudging was done to deceive people — including the voting public and government regulators.
DEFENSE ASKS JUDGE TO DISMISS CASE
Following the adjournment of court on Monday, the defense in Donald Trump’s hush money trial asked Judge Juan M. Merchan for an order dismissing the case immediately.
Trump lawyer Todd Blanche argued: “There’s absolutely no evidence that the filings were false. The business records were not false. There’s no disputing that Mr. Cohen provided legal services for President Trump in 2017.”
Blanche further argued that prosecutors have failed to prove their case and there’s no evidence of falsified business records or an intent to defraud.
Blanche underscored that Trump was in the White House while Michael Cohen was being repaid, far removed from the Trump Organization offices where his invoices and checks were being processed. Trump signed the checks in the White House, but he was doing so because Cohen was performing legitimate legal services for him as his personal attorney, Blanche argued.
COURT ADJOURNS FOR THE DAY
Donald Trump’s hush money trial has adjourned for the day, following the conclusion of the defense’s questioning of witness Robert Costello.
Costello will return to the witness stand on Tuesday.
DEFENSE CONCLUDES ITS QUESTIONING OF COSTELLO
After the fireworks over Robert Costello’s testimony, Trump lawyer Emil Bove tried to get at one of the main reasons he said he called the attorney to the stand: to rebut any suggestion from prosecutors that Costello was part of an effort to arm-twist Michael Cohen to stay loyal to Donald Trump.
“Mr. Costello, did you ever put any pressure on Michael to do anything?” Bove asked.
“No,” Costello testified. He said he considered Cohen a client and had only his interests, not Trump’s, in mind during their interactions.
Trump appeared alert and engaged, his attention focused on the witness box, during Costello’s testimony. When his attorneys finished their questions, he wrote a note on a piece of paper in front of him.
MERCHAN BRIEFLY CLOSES COURTROOM, FORCING REPORTERS INTO HALLWAY
Judge Juan M. Merchan on Monday afternoon briefly closed the courtroom where Donald Trump’s criminal trial is being held, forcing reporters into the hallway after he admonished witness Robert Costello for his behavior.
Costello aggravated Merchan repeatedly in his testimony by making comments under his breath and continuing to speak after objections were sustained — a signal to witnesses to stop talking.
At one point, frustrated as he was again cut off by a sustained objection, Costello remarked, “Jeez.”
“I’m sorry? I’m sorry?” a peeved Merchan asked.
“Strike it, I’m —.” Costello replied, cutting himself off.
At another point, he called the whole exercise, “ridiculous.”
After excusing the jury, Merchan told the witness: “Mr. Costello, I want to discuss proper decorum in my courtroom. When there’s a witness on the stand, if you don’t like my ruling, you don’t say ‘jeez’… You don’t give me side eye and you don’t roll your eyes.”
“Are you staring me down right now? Clear the courtroom, right now. Clear the courtroom,” the judge said.
For several minutes, there were no reporters in the courtroom or video access to the proceedings in the overflow room.
Jurors and reporters returned a short time later.
COSTELLO SAYS COHEN ASKED ABOUT ‘ESCAPE ROUTE’ FOR LEGAL WOES FOLLOWING RAID
Robert Costello testified on Monday that in a meeting shortly after federal authorities searched Michael Cohen’s home, office and hotel room in April 2018, a “manic” Cohen asked about an “escape route” from his legal problems.
“He kept on pacing back and forth, left and right,” Costello said. “He said ‘My life is shattered, my family’s life is shattered. I don’t know what’s going to happen.'”
Costello said he told Cohen the matter could be resolved quickly “if he had truthful information about Donald Trump and he cooperated.”
“I swear to God, Bob, I don’t have anything on Donald Trump,” Cohen replied, according to Costello.
Costello added that Cohen had lamented to him, “I don’t understand why they’re trying to put me in jail” over nondisclosure agreements, and disclosed that he’d arranged one with Stormy Daniels.
But, Costello said, Cohen told him Trump “knew nothing” about the hush money paid to the porn actor.
“Michael Cohen said numerous times that President Trump knew nothing about those payments, that he did this on his own, and he repeated that numerous times,” Costello testified.
WHO IS COSTELLO?
Robert Costello, a former federal prosecutor in New York, is relevant to Donald Trump’s hush money case due to his role as a Michael Cohen antagonist and critic in the years since their professional relationship splintered.
Costello had offered to represent Cohen soon after the lawyer’s hotel room, office and home were raided by the FBI in 2018 and as he faced a decision about whether to remain defiant in the face of a criminal investigation or to cooperate with investigators in hopes of securing more lenient treatment.
During Cohen’s testimony last week, prosecutors presented correspondence showing that Costello boasted about his closeness at the time with Trump ally Rudy Giuliani — a relationship he suggested could be beneficial to Cohen — and reassured him that he was “loved” inside the White House. In presenting those messages to the jury, prosecutors hoped to prove that Costello’s outreach was designed to keep Cohen in the Trump fold and to discourage him from flipping on Trump.
But Cohen ultimately did exactly that, pleading guilty to federal crimes and implicating Trump. Costello in the years since has repeatedly maligned Cohen’s credibility and was even a witness before last year’s grand jury that indicted Trump, offering testimony designed to undermine his account.
COSTELLO TAKES THE STAND
Attorney Robert Costello was called to the witness stand in Donald Trump’s hush money trial Monday afternoon.
Before he took the stand, Judge Juan M. Merchan ruled that he would allow the defense to question him about two allegedly inconsistent statements in Michael Cohen’s testimony and to “offer some rebuttal” to his testimony.
But, Merchan said, he won’t allow the questioning to become a “trial within a trial” as to whether there was a pressure campaign and how it affected Cohen.
The judge said he would give Trump lawyer Emil Bove “some latitude to explore the pressure campaign so you can explore some inconsistencies.”
ATTORNEYS ARGUE OVER QUESTIONING OF COSTELLO
With jurors out of the room Monday afternoon, lawyers for both sides in Donald Trump’s hush money trial argued about what — if anything — the defense should be allowed to ask witness Robert Costello about.
Prosecutor Susan Hoffinger contended that Costello shouldn’t be allowed to testify, but if he is, he shouldn’t be allowed to offer his opinions on Michael Cohen’s credibility. Trump attorney Emil Bove countered that he is being called to rebut the prosecutors’ suggestion that Costello was part of a supposed Trump-engineered pressure campaign to keep Cohen in the fold.
Just before the break, Bove said Costello would offer “direct evidence of perjury at this trial” by Cohen, suggesting that Cohen lied in testifying that he didn’t have even a retainer to hire Costello. “Part of what Costello is going to do is to testify that some of what Cohen said is false,” Bove said.
Costello was called to testify after the first defense witness, paralegal Daniel Sitko, who only briefly took the stand.
PROSECUTION RESTS ITS CASE IN TRUMP’S HUSH MONEY TRIAL
The prosecution in Donald Trump’s hush money trial rested its case shortly after 3 p.m. Monday following the conclusion of Michael Cohen’s testimony.
Cohen concluded his testimony after nearly four full days on the witness stand. He looked in Trump’s direction as he walked out of the courtroom before a court officer directed him down the aisle.
After Cohen left the room, Assistant District Attorney Joshua Steinglass told Judge Juan M. Merchan: “Your honor, the people rest.”
COHEN SAYS HE HAS ‘NO DOUBT’ THAT TRUMP SIGNED OFF ON THE DANIELS PAYMENT
Back on the witness stand Monday afternoon, Michael Cohen testified that he has “no doubt” that Donald Trump gave him a final sign-off to make the hush money payment to Stormy Daniels. In total, he said he spoke with Trump more than 20 times about the matter in October 2016. Some conversations were brief, while others were longer, he said, adding that they happened both by phone and in person.
Prosecutors appear to be eliciting testimony from Cohen aimed at diminishing the importance of a single phone call, which defense attorneys contend was not about the Daniels payments, but about a teenage prank caller who had been harassing Cohen.
C-SPAN VIDEO SCREENSHOT TO BE SHOWN AFTER ALL
After initially objecting, Donald Trump’s lawyers have agreed to let prosecutors show the jury in his hush money trial a still image taken from a C-SPAN video of Trump and his bodyguard Keith Schiller together at a campaign event at 7:57 p.m. on Oct. 24, 2016.
Trump lawyer Todd Blanche said he agreed to what’s known as a stipulation, allowing prosecutors to introduce the image without the need for extra steps — such as summoning a C-SPAN representative back to the witness stand to authenticate the image.
The defense made the compromise after prosecutors said they would seek to have the C-SPAN representative testify Tuesday morning, likely after the prosecution rests its case and the defense starts calling witnesses.
Blanche conferred with prosecutor Joshua Steinglass and reached the deal during a short break in the trial after conferring with Trump and other members of his defense team about how to proceed.
The judge in the case previously ruled against showing the image on grounds that the photo would amount to hearsay without being authenticated by a representative of the TV network.
DEFENSE OBJECTS TO POSSIBLE RETURN OF C-SPAN WITNESS
Trump lawyer Todd Blanche on Monday objected to having a C-SPAN representative return to court after prosecutors floated it in their request to show a screenshot of an October 2016 video from the network.
Blanche argued that doing so will unnecessarily prolong Donald Trump’s hush money trial. He added that prosecutors are on the verge of resting their case and that the defense may rest its case Monday, too.
The defense plans to call a campaign finance expert, a lawyer who offered to represent Cohen after the FBI raided his property in 2018, and a paralegal.
Prosecutor Joshua Steinglass said he hopes to have Robert Browning, the executive director of the C-SPAN archives, back on the witness stand on Tuesday.
EX-PRESIDENT OF HELLS ANGELS’ NEW YORK CHAPTER IN COURT TO SUPPORT TRUMP
Chuck Zito, the former president of the Hells Angels’ New York chapter, was among those in court Monday to support Donald Trump during his hush money trial.
Zito, who helped found the biker club’s local branch in the 1980s before setting his sights on Hollywood, was part of Trump’s entourage Monday, and was sitting in the back row of the courtroom before lunch.
Also known for his role as “Chucky The Enforcer” on the HBO prison drama “Oz,” Zito served real prison time on a drug charge in the late ’80s and early ’90s.
He’s not the only Trump ally in the courtroom who was previously convicted of a criminal charge: Bernard Kerik served three years behind bars after pleading guilty to federal tax fraud and other charges before his release in 2013. Trump pardoned him in 2020.
JUDGE RULES AGAINST SHOWING C-SPAN VIDEO SCREENSHOT
Before the jury returned from the lunch break, Judge Juan M. Merchan ruled that prosecutors can’t show the jury screenshots of a C-SPAN video of Donald Trump and his bodyguard Keith Schiller together at a campaign event the evening of Oct. 24, 2016 — about five minutes before Michael Cohen called Schiller’s cell phone.
The judge said the photo amounts to hearsay without being authenticated by a representative of the TV network. Assistant District Attorney Joshua Steinglass said prosecutors are arranging to have the executive director of the C-SPAN archives, Robert Browning, return to the witness stand. Browning testified earlier in the trial to authenticate videos of Trump campaign speeches in 2016.
Steinglass had said they wanted to show the image to blunt any suggestion by the defense that Trump and Schiller might not have been together at the time in question.
ATTORNEY ROBERT COSTELLO TO TAKE THE STAND AS A DEFENSE WITNESS
During a bench conference before the resumption of testimony in Donald Trump’s hush money trial, defense lawyers said they would call attorney Robert Costello to the witness stand during their defense case.
In addition to Costello, defense lawyer Todd Blanche said potentially they would also call Bradley A. Smith and a paralegal.
Costello, whose well-publicized split from Michael Cohen was chronicled in testimony last week, was invited last year to appear before the grand jury that indicted Trump after asserting that he had information that undermined Cohen’s credibility.
In a news conference after his grand jury appearance, he told reporters that he came forward to provide exculpatory information about Trump and to make clear that he did not believe Cohen — who pleaded guilty to federal crimes and served time in prison — could be trusted.
The move to call Costello is risky for the defense because it could open the door to additional testimony about what Cohen alleged was a strong-armed effort by the lawyer to keep him in line during the federal hush money investigation and to deter Cohen from cooperating with prosecutors after his home, office and hotel room were raided by the FBI in 2018.
PROSECUTION SEEKS TO SHOW SCREENSHOT OF C-SPAN VIDEO TO JURY
After the jury was excused for lunch on Monday, prosecutors said they’re seeking to show them a screenshot from a C-SPAN video of Donald Trump and his bodyguard Keith Schiller together at a campaign event on Oct. 24, 2016, just minutes before Cohen called Schiller’s cell phone.
Prosecutor Joshua Steinglass told Judge Juan M. Merchan they wanted to show the image to blunt any suggestion by the defense that Trump and Schiller might not have been together at the time in question. Trump lawyer Todd Blanche said he never suggested, nor would he suggest, they were apart.
Cohen previously testified that he needed to speak with Trump “to discuss the Stormy Daniels matter and the resolution of it” and he knew that Schiller would be with him. Cohen wired $130,000 to Daniels’ lawyer two days after the call in question.
Citing text messages and telephone records, Blanche pressed Cohen last week on the subject matter of the call, eliciting testimony that the witness was also dealing with harassing phone calls from a person who’d identified himself as a 14-year-old boy.
THE SCENE OUTSIDE THE COURTHOUSE
Donald Trump’s entourage of political supporters spoke to news reporters Monday in the park across from the Manhattan courthouse where his criminal trial is currently taking place.
The group sought to attack the case, the judge, the judge’s daughter and President Joe Biden.
South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson said Michael Cohen — who is currently on the witness stand — lied to Congress, the media and the court.
“You’d have trouble finding a single person he has actually told the truth to,” Wilson said.
Kash Patel, who served in Trump’s administration, said that Monday’s proceedings marked the first time in six weeks of trial that “we finally have a crime,” because Cohen admitted to stealing money from the Trump Organization.
“We also have a victim. That victim is Donald J. Trump,” Patel said.
U.S. Rep. Andrew Clyde of Georgia called for the U.S. government to withhold any federal money from being used in New York’s court system and Illinois Rep. Mary Miller said “any normal judge would have dismissed this case by now.”
PROSECUTORS REMIND COURT THAT COHEN ISN’T ON TRIAL
As she questioned Michael Cohen again on redirect, prosecutor Susan Hoffinger took a dig at the defense’s exacting cross-examination of him during Donald Trump’s hush money trial.
“I know you might feel like you’re on trial here after cross-examination, but are you actually on trial here?,” she asked.
“No, ma’am,” Cohen replied after a defense objection was overruled.
Asked to describe the difference between testifying in court against Trump and the 2018 federal case in which he pleaded guilty to various crimes, Cohen said: “My life was on the line. My liberty. I was the defendant in that case. Here, I’m just a non-party subpoenaed witness.”
COHEN SAYS THEFT FROM TRUMP ORG CAME AFTER HIS ANNUAL BONUS WAS CUT
Michael Cohen’s admitted theft from the Trump Organization came after his annual holiday bonus was slashed to $50,000 from the $150,000 he usually received, he testified on Monday.
Cohen said that Donald Trump owed technology firm Red Finch $50,000 for its work artificially boosting his standing in a CNBC online poll about famous businessmen.
Cohen said he’d paid the company’s owner $20,000 in cash “to placate him for the time being” after Trump had gone months without paying the bill.
Cohen said he later sought reimbursement for the full amount at the same time he was seeking payment for the money he paid Stormy Daniels. He said he kept the difference instead of paying Red Finch as a way of making up for his reduced bonus.
“I was angered because of the reduction in the bonus and so I just felt like it was self-help,” Cohen said.
COHEN PAID TO MANIPULATE ONLINE POLL
Michael Cohen testified on Monday that he shelled out money to a tech firm to help boost Donald Trump’s performance in an online CNBC poll about the most famous businessmen of the last half-century.
At first, Trump was polling near the bottom “and it upset him,” Cohen said during redirect. So Cohen reached out to Red Finch, who said they could create an algorithm that would get Trump’s name “to rise and rise significantly” in the poll by acquiring IP addresses to cast phony votes.
He said Trump initially wanted to finish first, but the two decided that would be suspicious. Instead, they decided to settle for ninth. But Trump refused to pay the firm after CNBC decided to nix a second round of the poll featuring the top 10 names. Trump, Cohen testified, didn’t feel he’d gotten his money’s worth.
When he was later reimbursed by Allen Weisselberg to pay back Red Finch, Cohen kept the proceeds for himself — an act of deception that, Cohen admitted earlier in the day, amounted to stealing from the Trump Organization.
But describing his actions to the prosecutor, Cohen defended the move. “I felt it was almost like self-help,” he said.
PROSECUTION BEGINS REDIRECT BY ASKING ABOUT REIMBURSEMENT
As prosecutor Susan Hoffinger began questioning Michael Cohen during redirect on Monday, she took aim at a point that Donald Trump’s defense made during their questioning: that Cohen helped Trump and his family with some legal matters in 2017, when Cohen received $420,000 from the then-president.
The sum included reimbursement for the $130,000 that Cohen had paid Stormy Daniels, according to testimony and evidence at the hush money trial.
Prosecutors say the $420,000 in payments was deceptively logged as legal expenses to disguise the Daniels deal. Trump’s defense says Cohen was indeed paid for legal work, so there was no cover-up.
Cohen testified that he never billed for the work he did for Trump and his family in 2017. When Hoffinger asked whether the $420,000 was related at all to those 2017 legal endeavors, Cohen answered, “No, ma’am.”
CROSS-EXAMINATION OF COHEN ENDS
The defense’s cross-examination of Michael Cohen in Donald Trump’s hush money trial ended with Cohen reiterating that he discussed the Stormy Daniels deal with the former president.
“Notwithstanding everything you’ve said over the years, you have specific recollection of having conversations with then-candidate Donald J. Trump about the Stormy Daniels matter?” defense lawyer Todd Blanche asked.
“Yes, sir,” Cohen answered.
“No doubt in your mind?”
No doubt, Cohen averred, and Blanche said he had no more questions.
WHAT’S NEXT FOR COHEN? MAYBE TV
Pushed before the morning break in Donald Trump’s hush money case to describe his lucrative Trump-related side businesses, Michael Cohen told defense attorney Todd Blanche “there is a television show” in the works.
Tentatively titled “The Fixer,” the show is based on Cohen’s own life and career. A producer on his podcast is currently shopping the show to studios, but it hasn’t been picked up yet, Cohen testified.
Later asked about his recent claim that he might run for Congress because he has “the best name recognition out there,” Cohen insisted he hasn’t built his profile on Trump’s back.
“My name recognition is because of the journey that I’ve been on. Is it affiliated to Mr. Trump? Yes. Not because of Mr. Trump,” he testified.
“Well, the journey that you’ve been on,” Blanche noted, “has included near-daily attacks on President Trump.”
“My journey is to tell my story, yes, sir,” Cohen said, eventually acknowledging his frequent criticisms of Trump.
Cohen also testified he’d be better off financially if Trump isn’t convicted because it would give him more fodder for the podcasts that provide a sizeable chunk of his livelihood.
Cohen was responding to questions asking if he’d benefit financially from a conviction in the hush money case.
As he spoke, Trump looked directly at the witness box, his arm draped over his chair.
BLANCHE PROBES COHEN’S CAREER AS TRUMP CRITIC
Before a morning break in Donald Trump’s criminal trial, defense lawyer Todd Blanche probed Michael Cohen’s profitable new career as a media-forward Trump critic.
The ex-lawyer said he’s made about $4.4 million from his books and podcasts since 2020, the year he was released from prison to home confinement. He was freed from home confinement in 2021.
Cohen also noted that he makes some income from a real estate rental property.
Before pleading guilty in 2018 to campaign finance violations and other charges, Cohen made about $4 million in 18 months, he testified. That money came largely from corporate consulting deals, plus the $420,000 he got from Trump to reimburse the Stormy Daniels payout and a technology expense, cover taxes and provide a bonus.
IN THE JURY BOX
Jurors in Donald Trump’s hush money trial remained largely engaged with Michael Cohen’s testimony on Monday, though some appeared to be dragging as his testimony stretched into a fourth day.
Several jurors stifled yawns while peering at the witness and looking at monitors in front of them as emails and other evidence were displayed. A few continued to take notes. Others sat back and took in the testimony, occasionally peering at the gallery of reporters and public observers.

Investigators return to Long Island home of Gilgo Beach serial killing suspect

Investigators return to Long Island home of Gilgo Beach serial killing suspect

By PHILIP MARCELO Associated Press
MASSAPEQUA PARK, N.Y. (AP) — Investigators returned Monday to the home of a New York architect charged in a string of slayings known as the Gilgo Beach killings.
State and county police officials descended on Rex Heuermann’s rundown, single-family home in Massapequa Park on Long Island sometime before 7 a.m.
They used their vehicles and set up barriers to cordon off the block and raised white tents in front of the red house.
Officers removed boxes and bags of evidence from the house as forensic and crime lab units spent much of the day on site. Officials from the Suffolk County medical examiner’s office also visited.
Spokespersons for the New York State Police and Suffolk County Police Department deferred questions to Suffolk County District Attorney Ray Tierney’s office, which declined to comment.
“As District Attorney Tierney has previously stated, the work of the Gilgo Beach Homicide Task force is continuing,” his spokesperson Tania Lopez said in an emailed statement. “We do not comment on investigative steps while ongoing.”
Lawyers for Heuermann and his family didn’t respond to calls and emails seeking comment Monday, but told local news outlets that his wife and two adult children were not in the home at the time.
Police searched the home, located in a suburban town about 40 miles (64 kilometers) east of Manhattan, for about two weeks after his arrest last July.
Monday’s search also comes about a month after authorities spent more than a week searching the woods in Manorville, another town on Long Island about 40 miles (64 kilometers) east of Massapequa Park, where the remains of at least two women were found years earlier.
Heuermann, 60, is expected to be back in court June 18 for a status hearing in Suffolk County Criminal Court in Riverhead. No trial date has been set.
In January, he was charged in the death of a fourth woman, Maureen Brainard-Barnes, who vanished in 2007 and whose remains were found more than three years later along a coastal highway on Long Island.
The formal charges came months after authorities labeled him the prime suspect in the Connecticut mother’s death when he was arrested in July in the deaths of three other women.

Pizza Strong raises more than $180,000 for Diller family

Pizza Strong raises more than $180,000 for Diller family

Stephanie Diller , The widow of late NYPD Detective Jonathan Diller received a check on Sunday for money raised by pizzerias across Long Island from the Pizza Strong fundraiser held in April.
More than 200 pizzerias banded took part. more than $180,000 was raised.

Pacers beat Knicks 130-109 in Game 7 to reach Eastern Conference finals

Pacers beat Knicks 130-109 in Game 7 to reach Eastern Conference finals

By BRIAN MAHONEY AP Basketball Writer
NEW YORK (AP) — Tyrese Haliburton scored 26 points and the Indiana Pacers rode one of the most sensational first halves in Game 7 history to a 130-109 victory over the New York Knicks on Sunday, advancing to the Eastern Conference finals for the first time in 10 years.
The Pacers made 29 of their 38 shots in the first half, a shooting percentage of 76.3% that was the highest in the postseason since 1997, when the NBA began keeping detailed play-by-play for all four quarters. They led 70-55 at that point and pulled away every time the Knicks tried to make a run in the second half.
The No. 6-seeded Pacers set an NBA playoff record by finishing at 67.1% for the game and advanced to face top-seeded Boston in a series that begins Tuesday. Indiana last reached the conference finals in 2014, losing to Miami.
Jalen Brunson left in the second half with a broken left hand, one final injury for a Knicks team that was decimated by them.
They got OG Anunoby back Sunday after he missed the previous four games with a strained left hamstring, but he clearly wasn’t moving well and was taken out of the game after just five minutes.
Pascal Siakam and Andrew Nembhard each scored 20 points and Aaron Nesmith was 8 for 8 en route to his 19 for the Pacers.
Donte DiVincenzo made nine 3-pointers and scored 39 points for the Knicks, who were trying to reach the conference finals for the first time since 2000 but couldn’t overcome the losses of Julius Randle, Mitchell Robinson and Bojan Bogdanovic, before losing Anunoby and finally Brunson.
Brunson finished with 17 points and nine assists, shooting 6 for 17 after scoring 40 or more points five times in this postseason. Alec Burks came off the bench for 26 points.
The third Game 7 between the franchises — the Knicks won in the 1994 Eastern Conference finals and the Pacers pulled out a 97-95 victory the next year in the East semifinals — was a chance for the Pacers to show off the offense that led the NBA with 123.3 points per game.
They scored 39 points in the first quarter, the most in a Game 7 in the play-by-play era, looking every bit like the team that set an NBA record this season by reaching 140 11 times.
The Pacers made 10 of their first 11 shots — it would have been 11 of 12, but Myles Turner’s dunk attempt bounced back out of the basket — and didn’t slow down much the rest of the half. Knicks fans who were screaming and chanting before the game were groaning during it as the Pacers made shot after shot, no matter how well the Knicks had defended them.
The Pacers led 39-27 after shooting 16 for 21 from the field (76.2%) and 7 for 9 from 3-point range (77.8%) in the first quarter. Indiana then went 13 for 17 (76.5%) in the second quarter, with the lead growing to 22 points.
The Knicks cut it to 70-55 at halftime, then scored the first seven out of the break as part of a 12-3 start to the second half that trimmed it to 73-67. But with the Pacers leading by seven, the Knicks committed three straight turnovers that helped Indiana push the lead to 84-70.
Josh Hart played through an abdominal strain for the Knicks, fouling out with 10 points and eight rebounds.


AP NBA: https://apnews.com/hub/NBA

George Washington Bridge climber in custody

George Washington Bridge climber in custody

The NYPD say the man who scaled the George Washington Bridge on Saturday has surrendered to police. The incident caused massive traffic delays for motorists trying to cross the bridge amid a heavy police presence.
It was not immediately clear if the man will be facing charges. Authorities would not confirm or deny whether the man was protesting, emotionally disturbed or climbing the bridge for another purpose.

Man charged with punching actor Steve Buscemi is held on $50,000 bond

Man charged with punching actor Steve Buscemi is held on $50,000 bond

NEW YORK (AP) — The man charged with assaulting actor Steve Buscemi on a Midtown street has been held in jail on bond in New York, prosecutors said.
Police have said the 66-year-old actor — known for his roles in “Boardwalk Empire,” and “Fargo,” among other performances — was walking in Manhattan on May 8 when a stranger punched him in the face. Police arrested a man Friday in connection with the assault, three days after having released a photo of the suspect.
Buscemi’s publisher has confirmed the attack, and said the actor was treated at a hospital with injuries to his eye but was otherwise okay.
The accused man, who is 50 years old, was arraigned on Saturday and the judge set bail at $50,000, prosecutors said. It was unclear if the defendant had a lawyer who could speak for him. A phone message has been left with the local public defender’s office. The suspect is due back in court on Thursday.
The criminal complaint alleges the man punched two people at the time, but authorities did not name them. It also says the attack on Buscemi was captured by surveillance video.
In March, Buscemi’s “Boardwalk Empire” co-star Michael Stuhlbarg was attacked, by a different stranger. The person allegedly hit him in the back of the neck with a rock in Manhattan’s Central Park.

Kreider’s 3rd-period hat trick lifts Rangers into Eastern Conference Final with win over Hurricanes

Kreider’s 3rd-period hat trick lifts Rangers into Eastern Conference Final with win over Hurricanes

By AARON BEARD AP Sports Writer
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The New York Rangers went from cruising through the NHL playoffs with an unbeaten record to suddenly struggling to close out a second-round series despite having a huge lead.
Worse, they found themselves down entering the third period with the prospect of having to play a Game 7.
Instead, Chris Kreider took over to ensure the Presidents’ Trophy winners finally closed out the Carolina Hurricanes and earned their spot in the Eastern Conference Final.
Kreider had a third-period hat trick to help the Rangers erase a two-goal deficit and beat the Hurricanes 5-3 in Game 6 on Thursday night, a stunning reversal after their postseason momentum had gone decidedly in the wrong direction.
“We talk about being a resilient group and a competitive group,” Kreider said, “and I think we showed that tonight.”
Kreider single-handedly erased the Hurricanes’ 3-1 lead entering the final period. The go-ahead score — which also completed the natural hat trick — came when he got position on Jalen Chatfield at the top of the crease and tipped in Ryan Lindgren’s pass to make it 4-3 at the 15:41 mark.
That made Kreider the third Rangers player to score three goals in a series-clinching game and first since Mike Gartner in 1990. It was also reminiscent of famed captain Mark Messier’s “guarantee” game in 1994, when he had a third-period hat trick in Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Final against New Jersey after promising the Rangers would force a seventh game. The Rangers went on to win the series and their most recent Stanley Cup title that season.
Kreider’s heroics finally allowed the Rangers to put away the Hurricanes, who had won two straight after falling into a 3-0 hole in the best-of-7 series. The Hurricanes appeared on the verge of forcing a Game 7 for a pressure-packed finale, but couldn’t contain the Rangers’ surge in the final 14 minutes.
“We just had to go out there and make a decision in the third period,” said Vincent Trocheck, a former Hurricane who scored the Rangers’ first goal on a second-period deflection. “Either show up and play and be a part of the series, or don’t. I think we had 20 guys show up in the third.”
Barclay Goodrow finished this one off by getting to a loose puck near the boards and scoring a long empty-net goal in the final minute, sending Goodrow to the nearby Rangers bench to be mobbed by teammates.
That sent the Rangers on to the Eastern Conference Final to face the Boston-Florida winner, with the Panthers leading that series 3-2.
Kreider’s first goal came at the 6:43 mark when he jammed the puck through against the left skate of Frederik Andersen, who had stopped Mika Zibanejad near the right post as Zibanejad skated in. He followed by tipping in a shot by Artemi Panarin on the power play to tie it at 3 at the 11:54 mark.
“Their top guys took over in the third there once they got that one,” Carolina coach Rod Brind’Amour said.
Igor Shesterkin hung in after a pressured first two periods, finishing with 33 saves and coming up with a big stop on Jordan Staal near the crease and another tying chance from Andrei Svechnikov off a faceoff win in the third period.
Martin Necas, Seth Jarvis and Sebastian Aho scored for Carolina, while Andersen finished with 19 saves.
The Hurricanes also missed on multiple late chances to increase their lead, with Jordan Martinook — who had a highlight-reel sliding effort to knock away a loose puck from the goal line midway through the second period — and Jake Guentzel each pinging the metal past Shesterkin to come up empty.
There was also a big opportunity in the third when two Rangers collided and fell to the ice in their own end, leaving Aho with a 1-on-1 chance on Shesterkin. But as Aho skated in from the left circle, he went wide right of the net as he tried to move to his backhand.
Those missed chances added up to a brutal exit for the Hurricanes, a team that was in the playoffs for the sixth time in as many seasons under Brind’Amour and has been open about the goal of breaking through to win the Cup.
Carolina finished three points behind the Rangers for the Presidents’ Trophy awarded to the top team in the regular-season standings, and entered the NHL playoffs as the favorite to win the Stanley Cup, according to Bet MGM Sportsbook. But the Rangers followed a Round 1 sweep of Washington by winning the first three games by one-goal margins — two coming in overtime — to threaten an unexpectedly quick resolution amid a 7-0 postseason start.
Carolina successfully beat back their power-play struggles for the Game 4 winner to stay alive, then rallied from a 1-0 deficit with four straight third-period goals to win Game 5 in Madison Square Garden and bring the series back to Raleigh.
Days later, the Rangers returned the favor with four straight of their own in the third, leaving a boisterous Hurricanes crowd in stunned disbelief. And it marked the second time in three seasons the Rangers eliminated the Hurricanes on their home ice in the second round, with the 2022 win coming in seven games.
“This puts a tough way to end a really good year,” Brind’Amour said. “These guys played their butts off all year. But this is what you’re going to remember. And that’s the hard part.”


AP NHL playoffs: https://apnews.com/hub/stanley-cup and https://apnews.com/hub/nhl

Judge considers dismissing indictment against Alec Baldwin in fatal shooting of cinematographer

Judge considers dismissing indictment against Alec Baldwin in fatal shooting of cinematographer

By MORGAN LEE Associated Press
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico judge is considering Alec Baldwin’s request to dismiss a grand jury indictment against him at a scheduled court hearing Friday.
The indictment in January charged Baldwin with involuntary manslaughter in the fatal shooting of cinematographer Halyna Hutchins on Oct. 21, 2021, at a movie ranch on the outskirts of Santa Fe.
Baldwin, a lead actor and co-producer on the Western “Rust,” has pleaded not guilty to the charge and his attorneys have urged dismissal. They have argued that prosecutors flouted the rules of grand jury proceedings to divert attention away from exculpatory evidence and witnesses. The involuntary manslaughter charge carries a maximum sentence of 1.5 years in prison.
During rehearsal, Baldwin was pointing a gun at cinematographer Halyna Hutchins when the revolver went off, killing Hutchins and injuring Joel Souza, the director. Baldwin has maintained that he pulled back the gun’s hammer, but not the trigger.
Baldwin’s motion to dismiss the indictment also argues that the grand jury received inaccurate and one-sided testimony about the revolver involved in the fatal shooting.
Special prosecutors say they followed grand jury protocols and accuse Baldwin of “shameless” attempts to escape culpability, highlighting contradictions in his statements to law enforcement, to workplace safety regulators and in a televised interview. A jury trial is scheduled for July.
Prosecutors turned their full attention to Baldwin after a judge in April sentenced movie weapons supervisor Hannah Gutierrez-Reed to the maximum of 1.5 years at a state penitentiary on an involuntary manslaughter conviction for Hutchins’ death.
Prosecutors last year dismissed an earlier involuntary manslaughter charge against Baldwin after being told the gun he was holding might have been modified before the shooting and malfunctioned. A new analysis of the gun last year enabled prosecutors to reboot the case.
The indictment against Baldwin offers two possible standards for prosecutors to pursue. One would be based on the negligent use of a firearm. An alternative is to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Baldwin caused Hutchins’ death without “due caution” or “circumspection,” also defined as “an act committed with total disregard or indifference for the safety of others.”
Defense attorneys also say prosecutors steered the grand jury away from testimony by witnesses including the film’s director, as well as assistant director and safety coordinator Dave Halls and props master Sarah Zachry. Halls last year pleaded no contest to negligent handling of a firearm and completed a sentence of six months of unsupervised probation.
The two-week trial of Gutierrez-Reed gave attorneys for Baldwin and the public a unusual window into how the actor’s own trial could unfold.
Baldwin figured prominently in testimony and closing arguments that highlighted his authority as a co-producer and the lead actor on “Rust.” Both the prosecution and defense in Gutierrez-Reed’s trial dissected video footage of Baldwin before the fatal shooting for clues about breakdowns in firearms safety.
Prosecutors said Gutierrez-Reed unwittingly brought live ammunition onto the set of “Rust,” where it was expressly prohibited, and failed to follow basic gun safety protocols.
Gutierrez-Reed is appealing the conviction, decided by a jury in March, to a higher court but hasn’t yet filed detailed arguments. At sentencing, Gutierrez-Reed told the judge she tried to do her best on the set despite not having “proper time, resources and staffing.”
After the shooting in New Mexico, the filming of “Rust” resumed but in Montana, under an agreement with Hutchins’ husband, Matthew Hutchins, which made him an executive producer. A wrongful death lawsuit in civil court by Matthew Hutchins and the Hutchins’ son was settled under undisclosed terms.
Defense attorneys say Baldwin last year was offered a deal to plead to a “minor offense” before a grand jury was convened, but the offer that was “inexplicably retracted” before the deadline to respond.